Blue Gold™ Results On Cid’s Organic Blueberry Farm In Minnesota!
As Monsanto parades their genetically modified seed, throwing it out like candy into the fields, future generations are being subjected to nutritionally void, disease-causing food. As the government protects the GMO industry, with its recent signing of the “Monsanto Protection Act”, the republic’s health interests are being discarded. A 2012 study, called the Corn Comparison Report, was recently released by Profit Pro and published on the website for Moms Across America March to Label GMOs – a group dedicated to raising awareness about the dangers of genetically modified organisms. The Corn Comparison Report detailed the nutritional deficiencies of GMO corn compared to regular organic corn. The report reveals the stunning levels of glyphosate in GMO corn and the number of vital nutrients that have been drawn out. GMO corn: nutritionally void The nutrition statistics for GMO corn are bone chilling. Here is what the report indicates: • Organic corn has 14 ppm of manganese. GMO corn has only 2 ppm. • Real corn has 7 times more manganese! • Organic corn has 6130 ppm of calcium. GMO is stripped down to 14 ppm. • Real corn has 437 times more calcium! • Organic corn has 113 ppm of magnesium. GMO corn is vacant, with only 2 ppm. • Real corn has 56 times more magnesium! GMO corn contains alarming glyphosate levels The amount of formaldehyde and glyphosate in GMO corn is unbelievable. To break it down, American EPA standards allow glyphosate in water of up to .7ppm. European tests indicate that animals begin experiencing liver damage at .0001 ppm of glyphosate in water. Putting these two statistics together, America’s water levels contain glyphosate that is 7,000 times greater than the amount required for animal liver damage! GMO corn takes that statistic up yet another notch. GMO corn contains 13 ppm of glyphosate or the equivalent of 130,000 times more toxicity than EPA water standards! The formaldehyde level of GMO corn is unspeakable. In a similar study on GMO corn, Dr. Huber found out that animals avoid GMO corn at all costs. When given a choice between both GMO and non-GMO varieties of corn, animals always go for the real organic corn. Huber also found out that .97ppm of formaldehyde is toxic to animals. The GMO corn he tried to give the animals contained 200 times that amount! This begs the questions: • Why is something this toxic fed to humans? • Why would humans touch the stuff in the first place? • Are people devolving? • Have their instincts been shut down? • Is their intuition numb? • Are they distracted by pretty labels and promises of safety? Genetically modified organisms are an open invitation to disease, cancer, and infertility. What a person consumes is what they become. Eating nutrient-void, formaldehyde-laden GMO corn is beckoning a disease-ridden population. There is enough evidence out now that explains the horror of genetically modified food. Any corporation that feeds this genetically modified system to the people should be tried for crimes against humanity. Sadly, Monsanto and other biotech giants may have just been pardoned for their crimes against humanity. Through recent lobbying by the federal government, Monsanto was able to protect their GMO industry and get Congress and President Obama to pass a provision that exempts them from GMO liability. This law was signed into motion on March 26 and allows biotech companies like Monsanto to bypass federal approval tests and plant their GMO crops despite well-known health risks. This provision frees biotech companies from their liability to the people and from judicial accountability.
Comparison of GMO and non-GMO corn
August 23, 2016
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Supercharge Your Dryland Alfalfa With Eden Solutions!
August 25, 2016

Blue Gold™ Results On Cid’s Organic Blueberry Farm In Minnesota!

This is a brief report on the production of organically grown (not certified) blueberries on my family farm in Carlton, Minnesota: “A brief report on the production of organically grown (not certified) blueberries on my family farm in Carlton, Minnesota: “My family planted two varieties of blueberries conducive to the cold climate of northern Minnesota. Chippewa and Superior were selected based on hardiness, disease resistance, and production. The field was planted in the summer of 2010 with 2-year-old plants from a commercial grower. The first two years there was average to low average growth on the plants. (If you want specifics on how they were planted, soil type, etc. I can furnish that individually.) One problem with the slow growth was little to no snow during one winter and below freezing temps. Although these are varieties that are suited for cold, extreme cold will still freeze off the buds. The snow cover insulates them. In the spring of 2013, I was fortunate to come into contact with James at Eden Solutions who discussed with me the organic liquid based products he wanted me to try as a topical applicant. I applied via back-pack sprayer than a 15gal tank sprayer from my four wheelers on average every 7 to 10 days. The surfactant qualities of the liquid, aided in water uptake and availability, as well as nutrifying the plants and soil. One of the most significant results I noticed early in the summer was the prolific flowering of the plants. Well after they were supposed to be done flowering, the plants continued to produce flowers. As an added note, I do have (2), 3-hive stacks of Italian bees adjacent to the field. Another noticeable difference was the vibrant color of the plants. They really looked healthy. Vertical growth was not as much as the previous summer, but there was very little fruit the previous summer for the plants to support due to the above mentioned harsh preceding winter. One issue I have been contending with the past couple of years has been the cycling of the Northern Forest Tent Caterpillar. These pests recur every 7-9 years and increase in number to a peak exponentially over about three years until they recede for another 7-9 years. 2012-2013 I believe, and hope was the peak. James advised me on the Blue Gold™ product as a deterrent. Upon initial application, the caterpillars slowed down but did not die. I increased the concentration by half and tested it on a few subjects. There was an immediate reaction to the spray. The caterpillars rolled over and died within 90 seconds. I initially spot sprayed any plants that had any caterpillars on them then sprayed all the perimeter rows to inhibit the migration into the field. I then applied to all plants as James told me it would change the pH of the plant to where the pest would not consume any foliage. This was confirmed as about two weeks after the fight there were virtually no caterpillars on any leaves. A few were observed on the stems but not the leaves. A DNR rep stopped by to place a Gypsy Moth trap on my property, and I showed her the reaction and result of the spray. She was astonished as the DNR’s approach is to aerial spray a pheromone to inhibit mating of the moths. Another note: Blueberry harvest for these varieties in this region is usually from about the 3rd week of July to the end of August. Another note: Blueberry harvest for these varieties in this region is usually from about the 3rd week of July to the end of August. This year we were picking the last of the blueberries on September 24th. No other growers in the region still had berries this late. Overall, I am amazed at the production results. I harvested 875lbs of berries from 1,000 plants that are 1/8th of the estimated maturity.” -Cid, from Cid’s Blueberry Farm

This is a brief report on the production of organically grown (not certified) blueberries on my family farm in Carlton, Minnesota:

 
My family planted two varieties of blueberries conducive to the cold climate of northern Minnesota. Chippewa and Superior were selected based on hardiness, disease resistance, and production. The field was planted in the summer of 2010 with 2-year-old plants from a commercial grower.  The first two years there was average to low average growth on the plants. (If you want specifics on how they were planted, soil type, etc. I can furnish that individually.) One problem with the slow growth was little to no snow during one winter and below freezing temps. Although these are varieties that are suited for cold, extreme cold will still freeze off the buds. The snow cover insulates them.

In the spring of 2013, I was fortunate to come into contact with James at Eden Solutions who discussed with me the organic liquid based products he wanted me to try as a topical applicant. I applied via back-pack sprayer than a 15gal tank sprayer from my four wheelers on average every 7 to 10 days. The surfactant qualities of the liquid, aided in water uptake and availability, as well as nutrifying the plants and soil.

One of the most significant results I noticed early in the summer was the prolific flowering of the plants. Well after they were supposed to be done flowering, the plants continued to produce flowers. As an added note, I do have (2), 3-hive stacks of Italian bees adjacent to the field.

Another noticeable difference was the vibrant color of the plants. They really looked healthy. Vertical growth was not as much as the previous summer, but there was very little fruit the previous summer for the plants to support due to the above mentioned harsh preceding winter.

One issue I have been contending with the past couple of years has been the cycling of the Northern Forest Tent Caterpillar. These pests recur every 7-9 years and increase in number to a peak exponentially over about three years until they recede for another 7-9 years. 2012-2013 I believe, and hope was the peak. James advised me on the Blue Gold™ product as a deterrent.

Upon initial application, the caterpillars slowed down but did not die. I increased the concentration by half and tested it on a few subjects. There was an immediate reaction to the spray. The caterpillars rolled over and died within 90 seconds. I initially spot sprayed any plants that had any caterpillars on them then sprayed all the perimeter rows to inhibit the migration into the field. I then applied to all plants as James told me it would change the pH of the plant to where the pest would not consume any foliage. This was confirmed as about two weeks after the fight there were virtually no caterpillars on any leaves. A few were observed on the stems but not the leaves.  A DNR rep stopped by to place a Gypsy Moth trap on my property, and I showed her the reaction and result of the spray. She was astonished as the DNR’s approach is to aerial spray a pheromone to inhibit mating of the moths. Another note: Blueberry harvest for these varieties in this region is usually from about the 3rd week of July to the end of August.

Another note: Blueberry harvest for these varieties in this region is usually from about the 3rd week of July to the end of August. This year we were picking the last of the blueberries on September 24th. No other growers in the region still had berries this late.

Overall, I am amazed at the production results. I harvested 875lbs of berries from 1,000 plants that are 1/8th of the estimated maturity.

-Cid, from Cid's Blueberry Farm

 

2 Comments

  1. Britt Hess says:

    I am starting a blueberry patch near carlton mn and I would like to know what was recommended for the bluberry farmer to use as a topical agent.

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